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By Craig A Doherty

A part of the 10-volume set local the USA, this name tells the heritage and tradition of the Plateau Indians. It starts with a quick set advent that discusses a few of the vast heritage and issues came across in the course of the Plateau Indian tradition, in addition to explains the idea that of tradition components to scholars.

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Plateau Indians

A part of the 10-volume set local the United States, this name tells the background and tradition of the Plateau Indians. It starts with a short set advent that discusses a few of the wide heritage and issues stumbled on during the Plateau Indian tradition, in addition to explains the idea that of tradition components to scholars.

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With these items, they would make intricate patterns on their clothes, especially on clothes and Dentalia Along the west coast of Vancouver Island and the Queen Charlotte Islands, a slender white univalve shellfish known as dentalium (plural dentalia) can be found in large numbers. Their shells were an important trading item for the Indians of the Northwest Coastal region. The shells, sometimes called money-tooth shells, were used in numerous ways by the people of the Plateau. They would string them together to form necklaces and would sew them onto all types of garments.

Small children were often the responsibility of older children in their family group. As children grew, they were often cared for by grandparents and older aunts and uncles. Often their The Cycles of Life ( 15 ( parents and others of their parents’ generation were involved in gathering, preserving, and preparing food for the survival of the whole family. As children grew, they started to learn the gender-specific skills they would need to help their family. Boys would spend more and more time with their uncles and grandfathers, learning hunting and fishing skills.

After the wake, the body was buried. There were no formal cemeteries among the Plateau people, and bodies were often buried among the rocks that accumulate at the bottom of steep slopes. People were buried in their best clothes, often with a number of personal possessions. After a body was buried, the person’s remaining belongings were given away. The husband or wife of the deceased would remain in mourning for an extended period of time. Both men and women of the Plateau wore their hair in long braids.

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