Download Slavery in the Cherokee Nation: The Keetoowah Society and by Patrick Neal Minges PDF

By Patrick Neal Minges

Exploring the dynamic problems with race and faith in the Cherokee state, this article appears on the position of mystery societies in shaping those forces throughout the nineteenth century.

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Extra resources for Slavery in the Cherokee Nation: The Keetoowah Society and the Defining of a People 1855-1867 (Studies in African American History and Culture)

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However, the mistress of the plantations was less than pleased at Marrant’s efforts. Being shocked to find her slaves at prayer, she told her husband to round up a posse and raid the prayer meeting. ”9 When the Revolutionary War began, Marrant became a “black loyalist” and joined the British navy; he lived in England for a short time following the war. On May 15, 1785, he was ordained to the Christian ministry under the patronage of the Countess of Huntingdon. 11 It was around this same time that Marrant also became a friend and follower of another Methodist minister by the name of Prince Hall.

There were communal fields and clan gardens worked with a hoe and dibble stick; surplus grain and vegetables were stored in a communal reserve from which all could draw when needed and in private granaries. 32 However, by the end of the eighteenth century there were dramatic changes in Cherokee culture and society. Beginning with the deer trade and evolving into the slave trade, commerce had become an increasingly important element in Cherokee society. As men were responsible for hunting and warfare, the trade in pelts and slaves became a dominant element and consumer items produced by Europeans became a critical factor in the Cherokee economy.

However, the mistress of the plantations was less than pleased at Marrant’s efforts. Being shocked to find her slaves at prayer, she told her husband to round up a posse and raid the prayer meeting. ”9 When the Revolutionary War began, Marrant became a “black loyalist” and joined the British navy; he lived in England for a short time following the war. On May 15, 1785, he was ordained to the Christian ministry under the patronage of the Countess of Huntingdon. 11 It was around this same time that Marrant also became a friend and follower of another Methodist minister by the name of Prince Hall.

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