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By Sara Ahmed

Analyzing the connection among strangers, embodiment and community, Strange Encounters demanding situations the assumptions that the stranger is just anyone we don't realize and as a substitute proposes that she or he is socially constructued as an individual we already understand. utilizing feminist and postcolonial idea this publication examines the effect of multiculturalism and globalization on embodiment and group when contemplating the moral and political implication of its critique for post-colonial feminism.

A various variety of texts are analyzed which produce the determine of 'the stranger', exhibiting that it has on the other hand been expelled because the starting place of hazard - similar to in neighbourhood watch, or celebrated because the foundation of distinction - as in multiculturalism. the writer argues that either one of those standpoints are complicated as they contain 'stranger fetishism'; they suppose that the stranger 'has a lifetime of its own'.

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Extra info for Strange encounters: embodied others in post-coloniality

Sample text

1 Recognising strangers I turn around as you pass me. You are a stranger. I have not seen you before. No, perhaps I have. You are very familiar. You shuffle along the foot path, head down, a grey mac shimmering around your feet. You look dirty. There are scars and marks on your hands. You don’t return my stare. I think I can smell you as you pass. I think I can hear you muttering. I know you already. And I hold myself together and breathe a sigh of relief as you turn the corner. I want you not to be in my face.

That is, such encounters allow the stranger to appear, to take form, by recuperating all that is unknowable into a figure that we imagine we might face here, now, in the street. On recognition To recognise means: to know again, to acknowledge and to admit. How do we know the stranger again? The recognisability of strangers is determinate in the social demarcation of spaces of belonging: the stranger is ‘known again’ as that which has already contaminated such spaces as a threat to both property and person: ‘many residents are concerned about the strangers with whom they must share the public space, including wandering homeless people, aggressive beggars, muggers, anonymous black youths, and drug addicts’ (Anderson 1990: 238).

You shuffle along the foot path, head down, a grey mac shimmering around your feet. You look dirty. There are scars and marks on your hands. You don’t return my stare. I think I can smell you as you pass. I think I can hear you muttering. I know you already. And I hold myself together and breathe a sigh of relief as you turn the corner. I want you not to be in my face. I cast you aside with a triumph of one who knows this street. It is not the street where you live. How do you recognise a stranger?

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